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23 Jun

Save Gillies Hill campaign marches on

Posted by admin

Gillies Hill in Cambusbarron is part of the official Historic Scotland Battle of Bannockburn battlefield. It was here that Robert the Bruce stationed his Ghillies before the battle in 1314. These Ghillies, according to folklore, following the two day battle initially from the hill, descended in droves, as the battle moved Scotland's way. The English were alarmed by the number and the noise from them and fled the field.

Fast forward to 2015, Gillies Hill is home to a variety of native animals including red squirrels, badgers, pine martens and peregrine falcons. It has been identified as ancient woodland and is frequently utilised by walkers, runners, mountain bikers and rock climbers.

Gillies Hill, Cambusbarron

The tourist attraction, which was functioning as a quarry between 1920 and 1996, has recorded more than 40,000 per year in recent times. Plans for further quarrying at Gillies Hill were lodged with Stirling Council in December last year, something that local group “Save Gillies Hill” have passionately fought against since 2007 when plans were first discussed. Applicants Paterson’s Quarries Ltd hope to extract 300,000 tonnes of rock a year from the site if they receive the go-ahead. This would mean 132 HGV movements throughout the area each day (12 per hour).

Save Gillies Hill campaigners against quarrying proposals had hoped that the hill would be turned into a Local Nature Reserve, potentially scuppering further quarry plans there. They are raising money to pay for the legal assistance required to fight this recent application and pursue their attempts to save the area in future. Sunday 21st June 2015 marked the Annual March of the Gillies where some of our own team at McCaskie took part to raise awareness of and continue the fight against the large corporations proposing the development. Three of our team call Cambusbarron home and our entire McCaskie team support them and this campaign to secure an area of historical significance which is just a few miles from our head office. To find out more information or to support the campaign, visit the Save Gillies Hill website.